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This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A massive bust of corrupt prison guards in Georgia, drug prosecutions halted over sleazy police tactics in Waco, a San Antonio cop gets his hand slapped for stealing from citizens, and more. Let's get to it:

In Waco, Texas, drug prosecutions were put on hold last Thursday after a narcotics detective was accused of putting false information in a police report. Waco Police Detective David Starr allegedly made false claims in a report and an affidavit from Starr regarding a February 2015 drug case. The report claimed the bust resulted from "interdiction" operations conducted by the Waco Police, but Starr later admitted the bust arose from a confidential informant and that he was ordered to misleadingly word the reports. Now, the Texas Rangers are investigating and hundreds of drug cases are at risk. "Unfortunately, as a further result of this unacceptable conduct, I will be forced to dismiss certain cases while an investigation into this matter is conducted," the McLennan County prosecutor said.

In Atlanta, 46 current and former prison guards and staff were arrested by the FBI last Thursday as the result of a two-year undercover operation targeting "staggering corruption within Georgia Department of Corrections institutions," as federal prosecutors put it. Among those arrested were five members of an elite squad charged with targeting drug dealing in the prisons. The guards and staff are accused of smuggling liquor, drugs, cell phones and other contraband into the prisons, as well as facilitating drug deals involving multiple kilos of cocaine and meth on both sides of the prison walls.

In Boston, a Bridgewater state prison guard was arrested Tuesday after state police set up an undercover heroin deal. Stephen Lebreux, 40, sold heroin to undercover officers on multiple occasions while off-duty and not at the prison. He is charged with heroin trafficking.

In San Antonio, a San Antonio police officer was sentenced last Thursday to three years' probation for stealing marijuana, a rifle, and thousands in cash from a local couple. Officer Konrad Chatys had responded to a domestic dispute between the couple when he took the items. As he did so, he told them he was "letting them get away with too much already." Chatys must also pay restitution to the couple.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

It's jail and prison guards gone wild this week! Most did their misdeeds for profit, but at least one did hers for love. Let's get to it:

In New York City, a Rikers Island jail guard was arrested Sunday on charges she smuggled marijuana in to an inmate and had sex with him. Guard Nicole Bartley, 30, went down when a drug-sniffing dog stationed at the prison alerted on her. She said the inmate "played me for a fool."

In Fort Bend, Texas, a Fort Bend County sheriff's jail guard was arrested Monday for smuggling illegal drugs into the jail. Naveed Muhammed Islam, 19, went down after an internal investigation into allegations of a crooked guard at the jail. He is charged with bringing prohibited substances into a correctional facility, a third-degree felony.

In Charlotte, North Carolina, two former sheriff's officers and two prison guards pleaded guilty Tuesday to a drug dealing conspiracy in which 14 others have already pleaded guilty. The crew went down after undercover officers posed as members of a drug-dealing operation looking for crooked cops to aid their cause. Former Northampton County sheriff's captain Jason Boone and former lieutenant Jimmy Pair, Jr., both pleaded guilty to drug conspiracy and bribery charges. The two prison guards were not named.

In Cedar Rapids, Iowa, a former Anamosa State Prison guard was sentenced last Wednesday to four years in federal prison for smuggling drugs, cell phones, and other contraband in to prisoners. Garrett Barton, 29, admitted not only to smuggling contraband, but also to being high while armed as a tower guard. He copped to one count of a Hobbs Act extortion under color of official right (accepting bribes).

In Memphis, four Shelby County deputy jailers were sentenced last Friday after being caught up in a sting involving smuggling what they thought was Oxycontin into the jail. Anthony Thomas got one month in prison, and Marcus Green, Brian Grammer, and Torriano Vaughan were sentenced to a year and a day. The four went down after an inmate alerted officials of the guards' willingness to subvert the law, and officials then set up the sting.

Chronicle AM: WVA Welfare Drug Test Bill Advances, ME Voters Want Drug Decrim, More... (2/9/16)

Medical marijuana bills get filed not only in Iowa, but also Australia and Greece, a new poll shows enlightened drug policy attitudes among Maine voters, Republican US senators hold competing events for and against sentencing reform legislation, and more.

Medical marijuana is seeing action at statehouses in the US and in foreign capitals. (wikimedia.org)
Medical Marijuana

Florida Medical Marijuana Bill Reemerges. A bill that would allow terminally ill patients to use medical marijuana has come out of hibernation in the House. After months on the sidelines, the bill, House Bill 307, was approved by the House Appropriations Subcommittee Tuesday on a 9-2 vote. It now needs one more committee vote before heading for the House floor.

Iowa Medical Marijuana Bill Filed. State Rep. Peter Cownie (R-West Des Moines) Tuesday filed a bill that would make it legal to grow medical marijuana, produce CBD cannabis oil, and create dispensaries. The bill is not yet on the legislative website. Republican lawmakers last year killed similar legislation.

Drug Policy

Maine Voters Support Drug Decriminalization, Not Punitive Drug Policies, Poll Finds. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of voters support decriminalizing drug possession, according to a new poll conducted by Public Policy Polling. More than seven out of 10 (71%) said substantially reducing incarceration rates was important to them. The poll comes as the state's Tea Party governor, Paul Le Page (R), is pushing legislation that would roll back reforms passed last year that make simple drug possession a misdemeanor instead of a felony.

West Virginia Senate Passes Welfare Drug Testing Bill. The Senate overwhelmingly (32-2) approved Senate Bill 6, which would create a three-year pilot program to drug test applicants for the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program if state employees have "reasonable suspicion" they are using drugs. "Reasonable suspicion" can be triggered by applicants demonstrating "qualities indicative of substance abuse" or having been arrested on a drug charge in the past five years. The bill now goes to the House of Delegates.

Law Enforcement

Massachusetts Bill Would Let Users Turn in Drugs Without Fear of Punishment. Rep. Ann-Margaret Ferrante (D-Gloucester) has filed a bill that would allow addicts seeking treatment to turn in unwanted drugs without the threat of prosecution. A person "who, in good faith, enters a police station and seeks assistance or treatment for a drug-related addiction, or is the subject of a good faith request for such assistance or treatment, shall not be charged or prosecuted for possession of a controlled substance" if the evidence for such a charge was gained as a result of seeking treatment. The bill is before the Joint Judiciary Committee.

Sentencing

Republican Senators and Law Enforcement Leaders Rally for Federal Sentencing Reform Bill. Sens. Charles Grassley (R-IA) and Mike Lee (R-UT) joined law enforcement leaders today for a Capitol Hill briefing in support of the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015 (S. 2123). The briefing, supported by Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration, comes the same day two other Republican senators, Tom Cotton of Arkansas and Jeff Sessions of Alabama, hosted an event to oppose the bill.

International

Australian Government Files Medical Marijuana Legislation. The federal government today filed legislation to allow the cultivation of marijuana for medical or scientific purposes. The bill would create a national scheme to regulate cultivation for such purposes.

Greek Lawmakers File Medical Marijuana Bill. Twenty members of the governing Syriza Party Monday filed legislation to legalize marijuana for medical and pharmaceutical purposes. "The proven beneficial effect in cases of especially dangerous diseases, such as glaucoma, cancer, epilepsy, anorexia nervosa, malignancies make the legalization of cannabis as medicine -- already used in many developed countries -- imperative. The criminalization of cannabis use has resulted in leading many patients and their families to acquire cannabis through illegal channels, something that entails substantial loss of revenue for the State, organized crime activities and pushing patients to resort illegal activities," the lawmakers argued.

Chronicle AM: RI Legalization Bills, More Philly Dope Cases Thrown Out, More... (2/8/16)

New England is turning into a real marijuana legalization hotspot as Rhode Island is set to become the latest state in the region to try to free the weed, the South Dakota legislature will take up medical marijuana after an initiative failed to make the ballot, Philadelphia's "tainted justice" policing scandals undoes more drug convictions, and more.

Rhode Island State House
Marijuana Policy

Rhode Island Legalization Bills to Be Filed This Week. Rep. Scott Slater (D-Providence) says he will file a marijuana legalization bill in the General Assembly this week, and Sen. Joshua Miller (D-Cranston) will file companion legislation in the Senate.

Medical Marijuana

South Dakota Medical Marijuana Initiative Fails to Make Ballot. A proposed initiative from New Approach South Dakota has come up short on signatures and will not qualify for the November ballot. The group needed nearly 14,000 valid voter signatures to qualify, but, based on a sampling of 5% of the 16,000 signatures handed it, state officials said only slightly more than half were valid, leaving the group with only 9,000 valid signatures. New Approach South Dakota has 30 days to challenge the findings.

South Dakota Medical Marijuana Bill Filed. State Sen. Angie Buhl O'Donnell has filed Senate Bill 167, which would legalize the use of marijuana for medical reasons. The bill was filed last Friday, one day after the deadline for filing new bills, but lawmakers agreed to waive the rules after state officials rejected a medical marijuana initiative for lack of valid signatures.

Drug Testing

Tennessee Welfare Drug Test Program Finds Very, Very Few Positives. In line with the experience of other states that have embarked on public benefits drug testing schemes, Tennessee's program has had just 65 people test positive out of 39,121 tested. Another 116 people refused to participate in drug screening, disqualifying them from benefits. The state has spent $23,592 on drug testing so far.

Law Enforcement

More Philadelphia Drug Cases Overturned, Thanks to Crooked Cops. A judge last Friday quickly overturned 51 old drug convictions brought by a tainted Philadelphia Police drug unit. The six officers in the dope squad managed to win acquittals on federal corruption charges, but prosecutors and judges still consider their cases tarnished. With Friday's dismissals, the number of convictions overturned or cases dismissed has climbed to 699. Several hundred more convictions could be overturned in the coming months.

January Drug War Deaths: Two in Night-Time Raids, One Unarmed and Fleeing From Police

At least three people were killed by American police enforcing the war on drugs last month, including one young man who died in a late-night drug raid that netted a little more than a quarter pound of marijuana.

Two of the dead were killed in night-time drug raids. Both were allegedly armed, although in neither case is it asserted that they fired on police. In both cases, police have not mentioned -- nor have local media asked -- whether these were kick-the-door-down, SWAT-style no-knock raids.

In a country where firearm ownership is both cherished and widespread, surprise police assaults that could be mistaken for home invasions can well result in homeowners grabbing their weapons to protect themselves and their domiciles. And then getting shot dead for doing so. Was that the case in these two deaths? We will likely never know. (The homeowners sometimes shoot and kill the invading police, too, but, unlike the police, they tend to get charged with murder.)

The third case raises a different kind of issue. Here, the victim was fleeing from police and made the all-too-familiar move "toward his waist band." He also had something in his hand, but it wasn't a weapon. And now he's dead, too. An unarmed man, running away from the police, is killed they were so quick to fear for their own lives.

Here are January's drug war deaths:

  • On January 4, deputies in Louisiana's Beauregard Parish doing a night-time drug raid shot and killed Eric John Senegal, 27. They also shot and killed a dog at the house. The house was under investigation for drug activity and the deputies were serving a narcotics search warrant, according to State Police Troop D spokesman Sgt. James Anderson. Sheriff Ricky Moses later explained that the deputies "encountered an armed suspect who has been identified as Eric J. Senegal and an attacking dog which resulted in the deaths of both Mr. Senegal and the dog." The sheriff didn't say what kind of weapon Senegal had or whether the raid was a no-knock raid. The search warrant for the raid said deputies were looking for marijuana, cocaine, and illegal pills. There hasn't been any word on whether they found anything. State police have opened an investigation a A local television station's Facebook posting of a story about his death generated numerous and heated responses as the national debate over police use of force hit home for commenters.
  • On January 5, police in Ceres, California, shot and killed Albert Thompson, 28, after he fled from them at a small apartment complex. The officers were on patrol "because of prior illegal drug activity there," according a Ceres Police news release. When the police arrived, Thompson took off running, and the officers gave chase. Police said Thompson reached for something at his waist, and the officers fired, striking and killing him. Initial police reports said an "item" was found near Thompson's body. It was later revealed that the item was a hand torch. Thompson was a parolee-at-large wanted by the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
  • On January 16, West Virginia state troopers helping Elkins police execute a midnight drug search warrant shot and killed William Keith Waldron, 26, when he met them armed with a shotgun. Waldron "did wield a firearm and as a result officers did defend themselves by firing at the subject," prosecutors explained in the criminal case against one of the two other men in the home at the time of the raid. Police have not said whether the raid, which included at least seven officers, was a no-knock raid. They found a little over a quarter-pound of weed, some plastic baggies, and a scale.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

It's pretty quiet on the corrupt cops front this week. Maybe that's a good thing.

In Boston, a former Boston police detective was sentenced last Friday to a year's probation and a $5,000 fine for conspiring with another officer to obstruct an FBI inquiry into the Academy Homes street gang. Brian Smigielski, 43, sabotaged the FBI investigation out of spite after being ordered to turn control of the Boston Police's investigation into the gang over to the feds. He pleaded guilty in September to one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

In Sullivan City, Texas, a former Sullivan City police officer was indicted last Friday on charges he stole marijuana leaves from the departmental evidence room. Angel De La Mora allegedly claimed he needed the leaves for medical reasons for his relatives. It's not clear what the exact charge against him is.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A Minnesota deputy steals dope and Christmas toys, an Indiana deputy coroner peddles pills, and a Texas narcotics officer gets nailed trying to rip off drug cartels. Let's get to it:

In St. Cloud, Minnesota, a Meeker County sheriff's deputy was arrested Thursday for allegedly stealing drugs and from Drug Take Back boxes and toys from Christmas toy boxes. Deputy Travis Sebring went down after he was spotted digging through the Drug Take Back box in the main lobby of the Law Enforcement Center in Litchfield. Sebring has admitted taking medications for personal use, and he said he took the stolen toys and gave them to his family. He's facing nine charges, which weren't specified in local news accounts.

In LaPorte, Indiana, a LaPorte County deputy coroner pleaded guilty last Friday to peddling prescription opiates. Dawn Maxson, 47, copped to dealing in Schedule I and Schedule III controlled substances, and is looking at up to 12 years in prison when sentenced. She was busted in October selling 70 hydrocodone pills for $500 in a K-Mart parking lot and had originally faced seven counts of selling pills. She got the drugs through a legitimate prescription, but only used some of them and sold the rest.

In McAllen, Texas, a former Starr County narcotics officer was sentenced last Friday to seven years in prison for his role in a conspiracy that involved ripping off drugs from drug cartels. Noel Pena, 30, was a Rio Grande City police officer assigned to the Starr County High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) task force when he agreed to provide a faked police report to an undercover agent posing as a drug trafficker who was looking for help in stealing a drug shipment. The fake report would make it appear that cocaine had been seized by the HIDTA, when it was actually to be ripped off. Pena was originally charged with two counts of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, but pleaded guilty to a single count in return for a lighter sentence.

Chronicle AM: Seattle Shrinks MJ Buffer Zones, 2nd Chance Reauth Heads for House Floor, More... (1/14/16)

Seattle moves to ease zoning restrictions on pot businesses, Ohio GOP lawmakers form medical marijuana task force, Mexico creates marijuana debate website, and more.

Will there be justice for Troy Goode? (family photo)
Marijuana Policy

Oregon Lawmakers Propose Tweaks to Legal Marijuana Market. The joint committee on marijuana implementation has rolled out its "base bill" containing a number of modifications they hope to get passed during the 35-day short session that starts February 1. One change would end the requirement that would-be pot entrepreneurs prove they lived in the state for the past two years; another would reduce sentences for many marijuana-related offenses. The bill is not yet available on the legislative web site.

Seattle Dramatically Reduces MJ Business Buffer Zones.The city council Monday night agreed to reduce the minimum distance between marijuana businesses and sensitive areas, such as schools, public parks, and day care centers, from 1000 feet to 500 feet in most areas, and down to 250 feet in the downtown core. The new city rules could mean up to 21 more pot shops for the city.

Medical Marijuana

Ohio Lawmakers to Form Medical Marijuana Task Force. Ohio House Republicans will later today unveil details on a new task force on medical marijuana. In November, voters rejected Issue 3, which would have included medical marijuana in a broader legalization initiative, but there is broad popular support for medical marijuana in the state. Recent public opinion polls show 85% support medical marijuana.

Asset Forfeiture

Wyoming Lawmakers File Bill to End Civil Asset Forfeiture. Members of the House Judiciary Committee have filed a bill that would require a criminal conviction before assets could be seized, effectively ending civil asset forfeiture in the state. The measure, House Bill 14, is sponsored by Reps. Mark Baker (R-Rock Springs) and Sen. Dave Kinskey (R-Sheridan). Republican Gov. Matt Mead vetoed similar legislation last year.

Drug Testing

South Carolina Lawmaker Wants to Drug Test Food Stamp Beneficiaries. Rep. Chris Corley (R-Graniteville) has filed four bills designed to tighten the screws on food stamp recipients, including one that would require them to submit to drug testing. The measure is House Bill 4412.

Law Enforcement

Family of Memphis Man Killed By Police Hogtie After Freaking Out on LSD Files Lawsuit. The family of Troy Goode has filed a class action lawsuit against the city of Southhaven, Mississippi, and the Southhaven Police Department over his death after being hogtied by police when he freaked out after ingesting LSD before a Widespread Panic concert. The official autopsy report blamed his death on "LSD toxicity" (Ed: a fictional notion at least in this context), but an independent autopsy ordered by his family found that his death was caused by being hogtied, which led to breathing problems that sent his heart into cardiac arrest.

Sentencing

Second Chance Reauthorization Act Heads for House Floor. The bill was reported out of the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday and now awaits a House floor vote. Its companion measure, Senate Bill 1513 awaits a floor vote in the Senate.

International

Jodie Emery Calls for Moratorium on Marijuana Arrests in Canada. There is no reason for Canadians to any longer face arrest for pot crimes, said Vancouver-based activist Jodie Emery, the wife of Canada's "Prince of Pot" Marc Emery. "Our movement is asking the Liberals to stop all marijuana arrests. We need a moratorium on marijuana arrests because money is being wasted going after people for pot and the longer we wait to really move forward on this file, the more lives will be negatively impacted."

Mexican Government Unveils Marijuana Website Ahead of National Debate. The government has launched a new Marijuana Debate web site as it prepares for a national conversation on marijuana policy later this month. The site seeks to promote "a broad and inclusive" discussion and will include links to information about marijuana legislation in 14 countries and three US states, as well as academic research and articles on all aspects of marijuana policy. The first debate will be in Cancun this month, to be followed by forums each month through April.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

C'mon cops -- how many times do we have to tell you? Don't rip off the department evidence room, don't peddle cocaine, don't smuggle drugs to prisoners, and especially, don't blow up your meth lab in the federal science lab you're supposed to be protecting. Let's get to it:

In Simpsonville, Kentucky, a Simpsonville police officer was arrested January 7 in connection with the theft of thousands of dollars in cash, drugs, and guns from the police department. Officer Terry Putnam, 54, is charged with first degree burglary, theft by unlawful taking over $10,000, theft by unlawful taking of a firearm, first degree criminal mischief, theft by unlawful taking of a controlled substance, official misconduct and tampering with physical evidence. His haul included about $30,000 in cash, and an unknown quantity of drugs and handguns. At last report, he was in the Oldham County Jail.

In Green Bay, Wisconsin, a former Green Bay Correctional Institute guard was arrested last Friday on charges he delivered drugs and other contraband to inmates, sometimes in return for drugs for himself. Benjamin Griffin, 37, went down after a confidential informant told the Brown County Drug Task Force there were a half-dozen guards at the jail involved in drug trafficking, and Griffin was the first one they turned up. He is charged with delivering contraband to inmates.

In Springfield, Massachusetts, a former Springfield police officer was arrested last Monday on charges he stole $400,000 in cash from evidence envelopes related to drug investigations. Kevin Burnham, a decorated and well-respected officer who retired from the force in 2014 after 43 years, is accused of pocketing the cash multiple times between 2009 and 2014, sometimes replacing it with counterfeit money already in evidence. He faces multiple counts of larceny and is out on his own recognizance.

In Indianapolis, an Indianapolis Metropolitan Police officer was arrested last Tuesday along with two other people in an ongoing drug investigation. IMPD Officer Nikolaus Layton, 35, the son of a Marion County deputy sheriff, and the others are all charged with suspicion of dealing in cocaine, conspiracy to deal cocaine, dealing in a controlled substance and possession of cocaine.

In Brownsville, Texas, a US Border Patrol agent was indicted last Wednesday on capital murder charges in the beheading death of a Honduran national. Agent Joel Luna is allegedly tied to the Gulf Cartel and was arrested along with four accomplices. The case began in March, when fishermen found a headless body floating in the Gulf near South Padre Island. They later found more than a kilo of cocaine, $90,000 in cash, and Luna's Border Patrol badge in a safe at his mother-in-law's house.

In Pendleton, Indiana, a Pendleton jail guard was arrested last Thursday in a store parking lot as he picked up a package he planned to deliver to the jail for payment. News reports didn't say what was in the package, but jail guard Tyler Wells now faces charges of trafficking a controlled substance with an inmate.

In Greenfield, Indiana, a former Hendricks County sheriff's deputy was arrested last Thursday for providing security for a massive synthetic drug operation that stretched from China to Indiana. Jason Woods had previously been arrested in December 2014 in the case, but has now been hit with new charges, including corrupt business practices, dealing a synthetic drug, and four other felonies.

In Cherokee, Alabama, a part-time Cherokee police officer was arrested Monday after the police chief noticed evidence missing and reported it to the state Bureau of Investigation. Officer Nikki Inman is charged with theft of property, possession of a controlled substance, tampering with evidence, and writing a bad check. Williamson says more charges could come.

In Santa Fe, New Mexico, a former Santa Fe County Jail guard pleaded guilty last Monday to federal charges for smuggling Suboxone into the jail. Edward Owens, 21, admitted smuggled the prescription drug into the jail in exchange for $600. He copped to charges of conspiracy to distribute and possession of Suboxone. Under the terms of his plea agreement, he's looking at up to 10 years in federal prison.

In Houston, a former Houston police officer was convicted last Friday of helping a Mexican drug cartel traffic drugs. Noe Juarez, 47, helped drug runners by running license plate numbers, sharing police tactics, and supplying them with weapons and body armor. He was convicted of conspiracy to distribute cocaine and conspiracy to possess firearms in furtherance of a drug trafficking offense. He's looking at up to 30 years in federal prison.

In Greenbelt, Maryland, a former federal police officer was sentenced January 8 to nearly 3 ½ years in prison for trying to cook meth at a federal science lab. Christopher Bartley, whose efforts led to an explosion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), had pleaded guilty in August to attempted manufacture of methamphetamine. During the sentencing hearing, his attorneys claimed he was making meth so he could better understand the drug and train other officers, but the judge didn't buy it.

The Most Outrageous Drug War Deaths of 2015 [FEATURE]

An as yet unnamed man killed by police in Rawlins, Wyoming, on December 30, after they were called to a convenience store about a person believed to be selling drugs in the parking lot, and Burlington, Vermont, resident Kenneth Stephens, 56, shot and killed by a state trooper and a DEA agent on December 22 when he met them with a rifle as they raided his apartment, were the last two people to make the Drug War Chronicle's drug war death toll tally, bringing it to 56 for the year.

This is the fifth year the Drug War Chronicle has tallied drug war deaths. There were 54 in 2011, 63 in 2012, 41 in 2013, and 39 in 2014. That's an average of just a hair under one a week during the past five years.

The Chronicle's tally only include deaths directly related to US domestic drug law enforcement operations -- full-fledged, door-busting, pre-dawn SWAT raids, to traffic stops turned drug busts, to police buy-bust operations. Some of the deaths are by misadventure, not gunshot, including several people who died after ingesting drugs in a bid to avoid getting busted and two law enforcement officers who separately dropped dead while searching for marijuana fields.

The dead included three other police officers, two Hattiesburg, Mississippi, cops gunned down in a traffic stop turned drug search in May and a Memphis cop gunned down over a $20 pot deal in August.

But 90% of the drug war dead are civilians. While some of the deaths are accidental and some are clearly justifiable, as when people are actually shooting at police, others are more questionable. Were all those guys in vehicles who got killed because police "feared for their lives" really trying to run down and kill cops over a drug bust, or were they just trying to get away?

And some are just downright outrageous -- one might even say criminal, although local prosecutors generally seem to disagree. In only one of the cases listed below was the police officer arrested, and in that case, she walked. Here are the worst drug war killings of 2015:

1. In February, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania, Police Officer Lisa Mearkle shot and killed David Kassick, 59, after he fled a traffic stop. Kassick was a relapsed heroin user who had done time in federal prison for heroin sales, and was carrying a needle and a spoon with residue on him. Video from Mearkle's stun gun shows her repeatedly tazing Kassick as he lay on his belly in the snow and yelling at him to show his hands as they jerk around from the tazing before firing two shots into his back four seconds apart. Mearkle was arrested on murder charges in April, but acquitted of murder charges in November.

 

Zach Hammond. Gunned down over his passenger's pot deal.
2. In March, Volusia County, Florida, Sheriff's Deputy Todd Raible shot and killed Derek Cruice, 26, during a dawn SWAT raid aimed at a small-time marijuana sales operation. Cruice, who was unarmed, was shot in the face. Police claimed they were "met with resistance and a shooting occurred," but Cruice's roommates vehemently disagreed. "He had no weapons on him or in the house," roommate Steven Cochran told the Daytona Beach News Journal. "Nobody was making any kind of resistance or keeping them from doing their job." Cruice wasn't even wearing a shirt, he said. "It's kind of hard to conceal anything or hide anything when this is all you have on. They entered the house and fired." Another roommate bluntly called the deputy's action's "murder." A grand jury directed by State Attorney R.J Larizza disagreed. In Ocober, it failed to indict Raible on any charge. Cruice was a popular figure in the local community, and there were protests over his death. The cops scored half a pound of weed and some cash, but no weapons in the raid.

3. Also in March, also in Florida, Putnam County sheriff's deputies shot and killed Andrew Anthony Williams, 48, as he attempted to flee in his vehicle from a "reverse sting." That's where cops pose as drug dealers, sell unwary customers small amounts of drugs, then arrest them. Deputies had successfully sold drugs to and arrested 10 people, but when they identified themselves and tried to arrest Williams, who was number 11, he declined. News 4 Jax had it this way: "…when they tried to arrest Williams, he took off in a blue SUV and, swerving to avoid deputies, ran into a tree. Williams then backed up and tried to take off again toward deputies causing four of them to open fire on Williams SUV, hitting him an unknown number of times."

Williams' death stinks for two reasons, First, reverse drug stings are a controversial tactic, sometimes arguably justifiable at the higher echelons of the drug trade, where selling sizeable quantities of drugs to a player to see where they go help crack a drug ring, but that logic isn’t at work here, where the only result is to round up some street drug buyers and drag them into the criminal justice system. Is having deputies pretend to be drug dealers to bust small-time users really the county's best use of its law enforcement resources?

And then there's the no-witness "he was going to run me over" defense used by the police to justify the killing. It happens not infrequently. Williams may have decided that getting busted on a minor dope charge was worth trying to murder a group of police officers with his vehicle. But could it have been that he was just trying to get away?

4. In April, 73-year-old Tulsa, Oklahoma, sheriff's Reserve Officer Charles Robert Bates shot and killed meth and gun trafficking suspect Eric Harris when he mistakenly opened fire with his pistol instead of his Taser. The shooting occurred in the midst of a struggle as Harris had attempted to flee on foot and there is no evidence that Bates intended to kill Harris, but the killing led to scandal over Sheriff Stanley Glanz's relationship with Bates and how the retiree volunteer managed to get in the middle of a Violent Crimes Task Force operation. Glanz was forced to resign in October and was indicted on a misdemeanor records tampering charge over his failure to release Bates' personnel records. Those records indicate that even though top sheriff's officials knew Bates wasn’t well-trained enough, they pressured others to ignore it. Bates himself was indicted for second degree manslaughter and goes on trial in April.

 

5. In July, Seneca, South Carolina, Police Officer Mark Tiller shot and killed 19-year-old Zachary Hammond. Hammond was behind the wheel of a car at fast food restaurant parking lot. He had driven there with a female passenger who was going to sell a small amount of marijuana to what turned out to be an undercover cop. Police said Hammond drove toward the officer, forcing him to fire, but that account was challenged by Eric Bland, an attorney representing Hammond's family. Bland said that the autopsy report showed that Hammond had been shot from behind and that the vehicle was not moving. The autopsy showed a first shot entering the teen's left rear shoulder and a second in his side five inches away that went through his heart and lungs before exiting his lower right side.

"It is clearly, clearly from the back," Bland said after viewing pictures of the bullet wounds at the coroner's office. "It is physically impossible for him to be trying to flee or run over the officer that shot him. This is a 19-year-old kid without a weapon in his car, clearly in the Hardee's parking lot on a date, and within five minutes he has two shots that appear to be in his back and his side, from an officer shooting him from the back -- and he's dead and this family needs answers."

The killing was egregious enough to spark a Justice Department investigation, which is still ongoing, but not enough to convince local prosecutors to go after Officer Tiller. In October, Solicitor Chrissy Adams declined to file criminal charges against Tiller. A federal wrongful death lawsuit filed by Hammond's family is pending.

 

 

Troy Goode. Authorities tried to blame his death on "LSD toxicity."
6. In September, a still unnamed member of an Akron, Ohio, SWAT team shot and killed Omar Ali, 27, during a raid on his hookah store. Police were investigating Ali for drug sales and domestic violence when they broke down the door to his business, then encountered him in the main room of his shop. Police said they ordered him to put his hands up, but he allegedly refused those commands and reached toward the back of his waistband. The unnamed SWAT officer then shot him. Police found no weapon in his waistband. What they did find was 2.8 grams of heroin and five doses of Suboxone hidden in his butt-crack.

7. In July, a group of police officers in Southhaven, Mississippi, arrested Troy Goode, 30, after he was behaving erratically under the influence of LSD he had ingested in anticipation of a Widespread Panic concert. His wife attempted to drive him home, but at some point, he got out of the car and began creating a disturbance. Police were called, and they chased and arrested him, hogtieing him face down on a stretcher. He was charged with resisting arrest, then taken in an ambulance to a hospital, where he died two hours later. In December, the State Medical Examiner ruled that Goode had died of "LSD toxicity," but given that there are no known cases of fatal LSD overdoses, that finding is hard to credit. Goode's family isn't buying it; they instead cite an,independent autopsy report that found Goode died after being hogtied and left prone for an extended period. That stress position caused him to have trouble breathing and, as his heart attempted to compensate, it went into cardiac arrhythmia. "He was suffocating. His heart increased into what is called tachycardia," family attorney Tim Edwards said. "There is no scientific basis to attribute his death to LSD. This was lethal force, putting someone in a prolonged hogtied position," Edwards said. "This was not a situation where a 300-pound man attacked a police officer in the dark. This was a science nerd." The family has asked the Justice Department to file a civil rights investigation and says it plans to file a lawsuit over Goode's death this month.

Drug War Issues

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