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This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A newly elected West Virginia sheriff has a meth problem, a Kentucky drug detective develops a case of sticky fingers, and more. Let's get to it:

In Spencer, West Virginia, the newly elected Roane County sheriff was arrested Tuesday on charges he stole methamphetamine from the evidence room of his previous employer, the Spencer Police Department. Sheriff Bo Williams faces removal from office after being charged with grand larceny. He had been placed on leave and resigned from the Spencer Police in December after investigators found evidence bags in his car and home. Williams has admitted to the theft and said he had been strung out for more than a year.

In Louisville, Kentucky, a former Louisville Metro Police detective pleaded guilty December 22 to stealing cash from UPS packages he was inspecting as part of the Narcotics Airport Interdiction Team. Kyle Willet, 48, "would identify UPS packages that possibly contained cash. He would then take the packages to his vehicle and open them. On a number of occasions, he then stole the contents of (the) packages." Federal prosecutors said he got away with nearly $75,000 in cash. Willet's attorney said that he was sorry, "but I think it's important for everyone to know that's whose money it was. It's cartel drug dealer money." Willet copped to one count of theft from interstate commerce and is looking at up to 10 years in federal prison when sentenced in April.

In Philadelphia, a former Bucks County jail guard was sentenced last Wednesday to between six and 23 months in prison for trying to smuggle suboxone into the Bucks County Correctional Facility in return for a $500 bribe. John Christopher Dingle, 36, copped to one count of possession with intent to deliver a controlled substance. Dingle said he was trying to help a prisoner who had helped him maintain order, but the prisoner's girlfriend was secretly working with the cops, and he was arrested after accepting suboxone strips as part of the plan.

2016: People Still Killed in US Drug War at the Rate of One a Week [FEATURE]

With 2016 now behind us, it's time for some year-end accounting, and when it comes to fatalities related to drug law enforcement, that accounting means tallying up the bodies. The good news is that drug war deaths are down slightly from last year; the bad news is that people are still being killed at the rate of about once a week, as has been the norm in recent years. There were 49 people killed in the drug war last year.

This is the sixth year that Drug War Chronicle has tallied drug war deaths. There were 54 in 2011, 63 in 2012, 41 in 2013, 39 in 2014, and 56 in 2015, That's an average of just a hair under one a week during the past six years.

The Chronicle's tally only include deaths directly related to US domestic drug law enforcement operations -- full-fledged, door-busting, pre-dawn SWAT raids, to traffic stops turned drug busts, to police buy-bust operations. Some of the deaths are by misadventure, not gunshot, including several people who died after ingesting drugs in a bid to avoid getting busted and two law enforcement officers who separately dropped dead while.

Many of those killed either brandished a weapon or actually shot at police officers, demonstrating once again that attempting to enforce drug prohibition in a society rife with weapons is a recipe for trouble. Some of those were homeowners wielding weapons against middle-of-the-night intruders who they may or may not have known were police.

But numerous others were killed in their vehicles by police who claimed suspects were trying to run them down and feared for their lives when they opened fire. Could those people have been merely trying to flee from the cops? Or were they really ready to kill police to go to avoid going to jail on a drug charge?

Which is not to understate the dangers to police enforcing the drug laws. The drug war took the lives of four police officers last year, one in a shootout with a suspect, one in an undercover drug buy gone bad, one while doing a drug interdiction training exercise at a bus station, and one while engaged in a nighttime drug raid over a single syringe. That's about par for the course; over the six years the Chronicle has been keeping count about one cop gets killed for every 10 dead civilians.

Here are December's drug war deaths:

On December 7, in Dallas, Texas, Keelan Charles Murray, 37, shot and killed himself as local police operating as part of a DEA drug task force attempted to arrest him for receiving a package of synthetic opioids. Police said they were clearing the apartment when they heard a gunshot from upstairs. A Duncanville police officer then shot Murray in the shoulder, and Murray then turned his own gun on himself. Murray was locally notorious for having sold heroin to former Dallas Cowboy football player Matt Tuinei, who overdosed on it and died in 199. Dallas Police are investigating.

On December 11, in White Hall, West Virginia, Marion County police attempting to serve a drug arrest warrant shot and killed Randy Lee Cumberledge, 39, in the parking lot of the local Walmart. Police said they spotted Cumberledge's vehicle, but when they approached and ordered him to show his hands, he put his vehicle into gear and "drove aggressively" toward a deputy. Both the deputy and a White Hall police officer opened fire, killing Cumberland. There was no mention of any firearms recovered. The West Virginia State Police are investigating.

On December 12, in Byron, Georgia, member of a Peach County Drug Task Force SWAT team shot and killed Rainer Smith, 31, when he allegedly opened fire on them with a shotgun as they forced their way into his home to arrest him. Smith wounded two Byron police officers before return fire from police killed him. Police said no one answered the door when they arrived, so they forced their way in, and were immediately met by gunfire. Smith's live-in girlfriend and infant daughter were in the home with him. They were uninjured. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation is investigating.

On December 21, in Knox, Indiana, Knox Police shot and killed William Newman, 46, as they attempted to arrest him for possession of methamphetamine, failure to appear for dealing meth, and violating parole. Police said Knox attempted to flee, almost running down an officer, and they opened fire. He died in a local hospital hours later. The Indiana State Police are investigating.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A Maryland police drug lab director gets caught with her hand in the cookie jar, a Texas border town cop gets nailed for ripping off cocaine, and more. Let's get to it:

In Millersville, Maryland, the head of the Anne Arundel County Police drug lab was arrested last Wednesday for allegedly stealing prescription opioids and other drugs from drug drop-off boxes. Annette Box, 48, went down after she got into a traffic accident and investigators found pills in her car that were not prescribed to her. She had 29 Atropine tablets, 31 Diazepam tablets, 29 Tramadol pills, 50 hydromorphone pills, one Alprazolam pill, and one hydrocodone pill. She faces one count of possession of a controlled substance for each kind of pill.

In Columbus, Indiana, the former Columbus Police narcotics division supervisor was sentenced last Wednesday after he pleaded guilty to stealing drugs from the department. Jeremy Coomes, 39, admitted taking drugs from the evidence room, but he won't have to do any jail time if he keeps his nose clean. He was sentenced to nine years, but will serve the first year under house arrest and the next five years on probation.

In McAllen, Texas, a former Mission police officer was sentenced last Wednesday to 25 years in prison for stealing cocaine and then arranging a fake bust to cover up the theft. Hector Mendez, 46, a former DEA task force member, was convicted of stealing nearly 15 kilograms of cocaine from a Mission home, diluting the cocaine, and then letting some of the cut dope be seized during a fake drug bust. He was convicted of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and possession with intent to distribute cocaine.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A Homeland Security agent was living large on stolen dope money, a New York state cop was slinging coke and weed, and more. Let's get to it:

In Niagara Falls, New York, a former Niagara Falls police officer was arrested last Tuesday on charges she sold cocaine to undercover cops. Stephanie Costanza, 28, her boyfriend, and another woman were all arrested on cocaine and marijuana sales charges. She had been on leave since an initial arrest last month, but has now resigned from the force.

In San Diego, a former US Homeland Security Investigations agent was indicted last Wednesday on charges he stole hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash from drug money couriers and tried to hide the money via real estate transactions in American and Croatian banks. Former agent Tyrone Cedric Duren, 46, worked on Homeland Security's Bulk Cash Smuggling Taskforce, which targeted Mexican drug trafficking organizations and participated in at least 20 major cash seizures, but is accused of conducting searches and seizures without reporting them. Duren and his wife made at least $1.2 million in cash deposits over a four-year period. He faces money laundering, bank fraud conspiracy, false statements, and structuring financial transaction charges. He's out on bail.

In Houston, a Jefferson County jail supervisor was convicted last Thursday of taking bribes from a jailed Mexican cartel leader. Donald Roy Kelly was found to have initiated contact with Gulf Cartel leader Francisco Saenz-Tamez, who was there pending trial on federal drug trafficking charges, offering him a cell phone in return for a cash payment. Kelly provided a cell phone, as well as fast food, to Saenz-Tamez. Kelly went down when prison authorities found the phone weeks later and traced it back to him. He was found guilty of providing a prison inmate with a prohibited object and bribery of a public official. He's looking at up to 15 years in federal prison.

In Lebanon, Ohio, a former Warren County jail guard was sentenced last Thursday to nine months in prison for taking money to smuggle drugs to inmates. Travis Caudill, 36, went down when he was caught bringing a package of marijuana wrapped in duct tape to work with him. He then confessed that he was taking bribes to do so. He pleaded guilty to a third-degree felony charge of conveying prohibited items into a detention facility.

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A former Ohio sheriff goes to prison for stealing pills, a former New Mexico cop is in trouble for buying sex with meth, and more. Let's get to it:

In Las Cruces, New Mexico, a former Las Cruces police officer was arrested last Wednesday after being accused of trading drugs for sex. Alex Smith, 32, a seven-year veteran of the force, was originally suspended after being accused of giving methamphetamine to a woman while in his police uniform and wearing his badge, but he's now been charged with trafficking meth by distribution and conspiracy to commit trafficking. The woman described Smith as her drug "connect" and boasted that she had performed sexual favors for him in return for drugs. He met the woman in his official capacity when responding to a domestic violence report several years ago.

In Brownsville, Texas, a former Edcouch police officer pleaded guilty last Wednesday to working with Mexican drug traffickers. Vicente Salinas copped to one count of conspiring to possess with intent to distribute cocaine. He admitted staging fake drug busts in a scheme to steal and re-sell the drugs. He's looking at up to 40 years in federal prison.

In Fremont, Ohio, the former Sandusky County sheriff was sentenced Tuesday to four years in prison for stealing prescription drugs and misusing office funds. Kyle Overmyer also has to pay $25,000 in restitution. A special prosecutor accused him of stealing pills from drug disposal boxes and deceiving multiple doctors into giving him pain pills. He pleaded guilty last month to 13 felony counts of theft of dangerous drugs and theft in office.

Chronicle AM: Mexico Senate Approves MedMJ, WI Lawmaker Wants HS Drug Testing, More... (12/14/16)

With the backing of the president, Mexico's Senate has approved medical marijuana; Kentucky's attorney general identifies the opioid epidemic as the state's biggest problem, Nevada drug dogs trained to sniff out marijuana face an uncertain future after legalization, and more.

Do you want to play high school sports in Wisconsin? A GOP lawmaker wants you to have to pee in a cup first. (Wikimedia)
Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Kentucky AG Says Opioid Epidemic Should Be Legislature's Top Priority. Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear said Tuesday that the opioid epidemic -- not a failing pension program -- is the state's biggest problem and the Republican-controlled legislature should make that its top priority. "We have a very important pension problem that we have to tackle, but a pension hasn't killed anyone's father or mother or taken a child from a parent," Beshear said. "This drug epidemic is the single largest threat to the lives of our citizens and also to our economy itself."

Drug Testing

Wisconsin Lawmaker Wants to Impose Drug Testing on High School Students Statewide. Whether to drug test students is a question traditionally left to local school boards, but state Rep. Joel Kleefisch (R-Oconomowoc) is drafting a bill to impose drug testing on some students statewide. He said he will introduce a bill that will require private and public schools to have policies to randomly drug test students who participate in voluntary activities, such as sports or choir or the debate club. Only a handful of Wisconsin school districts currently have such policies.

Law Enforcement

After Pot Vote, Nevada Drug Dogs Face Uncertain Future. With legal marijuana looming in the state's near future, Nevada drug dogs trained to sniff marijuana could be out of a job. Drug dogs are trained to detect various substances and will alert on any of them, but after January 1, they could be alerting on a legal substance, and that means their usefulness to law enforcement is in question. They could be retrained (difficult and expensive) or replaced (expensive).

International

Mexico Senate Votes Overwhelmingly to Approve Medical Marijuana. The Mexican Senate voted 98-7 Tuesday to approve medical marijuana legislation. The move comes after President Enrique Pena Nieto earlier this year signaled his support. Some lawmakers said they were disappointed the bill didn't legalize marijuana outright.

Philippines President Admits Personally Killing People. Speaking Monday about his bloody war on drugs, which has left nearly 6,000 dead in six months, President Rodrigo Duterte admitted to personally killing people while mayor of Davao City, where he has long been accused of tolerating death squads. "In Davao I used to do it personally. Just to show to the guys [police officers] that if I can do it, why can't you. And I'd go around in Davao with a motorcycle, with a big bike around, and I would just patrol the streets, looking for trouble also. I was really looking for a confrontation so I could kill," he said.

Seven More Drug War Deaths

When police in Charlotte, North Carolina, shot and killed Keith Lamont Scott in September in an incident that began when they spotting him rolling a joint in his car, the city was shaken by angry protests. Part of it was that he was another black man gunned down by police; part of it was undoubtedly because video taken by Scott's wife as her husband was killed went viral.

Most drug war-related deaths don't get so much attention, but they happen with depressing regularity. The Drug War Chronicle has been tallying them since 2011, and throughout that period, drug war deaths have remained fairly constant, averaging about one a week throughout that period.

The good news is that this year it looks like we're not going to reach that one a week threshold. The bad news is we're still going to get close. With less than a month to go, the Chronicle's tally this year has reached 45.

Here are the seven people killed by police enforcing drug laws since the Scott killing. At least three of them were killed as they attempted to flee police in their vehicles, including one where a bystander video shows police opening fire after he posed no obvious immediate danger to police.

On September 27 in Phoenix, Arizona, a Phoenix police officer shot and wounded John Ethan Carpenter, 26, who died of his wounds a week later. Police were tailing Carpenter as part of a drug investigation and had arranged a drug deal with him. He pulled up to a convenience store parking lot next to an undercover cop who was part of the investigation, and other officers then blocked his vehicle in with a marked police cruiser. When officers approached on foot, Carpenter reportedly pulled a hand gun and pointed it at them. When they retreated, he put his vehicle in reverse, ramming the police cruiser, and the undercover narc then "feared for the safety of his fellow officers" and opened fire. Drugs were found in the vehicle. Carpentier had previously done prison time for aggravated assault and drug paraphernalia (!?).

On October 19, in Willoughby, Ohio, a Willoughby police officer shot and killed Frank Sandor, 38, as he attempted to speed away from two officers questioning him in the parking lot of a Lowe's Home Improvement store. Sandor was wanted on drugs and escape warrants and first gave officers false information when they stopped him, then put his vehicle in reverse, striking a police motorcycle parked behind him before driving off. A YouTube video posted shortly after the incident shows the motorcycle officer shooting three times at Sandor's vehicle as it fled -- after the officer was no longer in any immediate danger. That video showed the officer limping after he fired the shots. Sandor's vehicle rolled to a halt a few yards away. The Ohio Bureau of Investigation is conducting the investigation of the shooting.

On October 25, in Elkton, Maryland, state police attempting to serve a Delaware drugs and guns arrest warrant at a local motel shot and killed Brandon Jones and Chelsea Porter, both 25, when, instead of surrendering to the dozens of police surrounding the motel, they came out of their motel room with guns pointed at police. Jones came out first, refused demands to drop the weapon, and was shot. Then Porter did the same thing. The shooting will be investigated by Maryland State Police, as is protocol when any police action results in a death.

On November 3, in Salisbury, North Carolina, a member of the Salisbury Police's SWAT-style Special Response Team shot and killed Ferguson Laurent, 23, as the team executed a "no-knock" search warrant looking for drugs, guns, and stolen property. "One subject fired at least one shot at the officers," said an official statement from the department. "Officers returned fire and struck the subject who has since passed away at the hospital." The officer who shot Laurent was identified as K. Boehm. Boehm shot and killed another suspect in 2008; that killing was found to be justified. Word of the killing spread rapidly and a "tense" crowd gathered at the scene, leading Police Chief Jerry Stokes to warn that while people had a First Amendment right to protest, "if you start becoming violent and damaging property, then that is the problem." The State Bureau of Investigation is investigating the shooting.

On November 15, in Webster, Texas, members of the nearby Alvin Police Department Street Crimes Unit shot and killed Robert Daffern, 37, after locating the wanted drug felon at a motel. Police said they approached Daffern, but that he didn't comply with commands to surrender and instead brandished a pistol and aimed at one of the officers. The Alvin Police investigators then fired several rounds, leaving Daffern dead at the scene. Police found a second pistol in his pocket, and a "significant amount" of drugs and cash. The incident is being investigated by the Webster Police Department and the Harris County District Attorney's office and will be reviewed by a grand jury.

On November 28, in Hickory, North Carolina, a Catawba County sheriff's deputy with the narcotics division shot and killed Irecas Valentine, 41, during a "narcotics investigation." The sheriff's office said "an altercation occurred involving the unidentified suspect's vehicle and an undercover deputy's vehicle" and "shots were then fired by at least one deputy." Valentine died after being transported to a local hospital. The State Bureau of Investigation is investigating the case.

Chronicle AM: Trump Names Drug Warrior for DHS, Congress Funds Opioid Treatment, More... (12/8/16)

Another Trump nominee raising eyebrows and concerns among drug reformers, Congress passes a health care omnibus bill that includes $1 billion for opioid treatment, Montana dispensaries are cleared to reopen, and more.

Trump's Department of Homeland Security pick, Gen. John Kelly (Creative Commons/Wikimedia)
Marijuana Policy

Anchorage Gets Its First Marijuana Shop on December 17. Alaska's largest city will have a place to buy legal marijuana in less than ten days. Alaska Fireweed in downtown Anchorage has announced that it will open at high noon on December 17.

Colorado Governor Aims to Rein In Home Pot Cultivation. Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) has told lawmakers he wants to reduce black market marijuana exports by imposing a 12-plant limit on grows at private homes, banning collective recreational grows, and imposing tighter restrictions on medical marijuana caregivers. It isn't going to happen without a fight, marijuana activists say.

Vermonters Can Seek Pardons for Small-Time Marijuana Possession Convictions -- This Month Only. Governor Peter Shumlin (D) will consider pardoning Vermont convictions of possession for up to an ounce of marijuana, but people have to apply before the end of this month. The state decriminalized possession of less than an ounce in 2013. Seeking a pardon doesn't necessarily mean you'll get one, though. Click on the link to see the pardon form.

Medical Marijuana

Montana Judge Clears Dispensaries to Reopen. A district court judge in Helena has ruled that a wording error in last month's successful medical marijuana initiative should not keep sick patients from having access to the plant now. The initiative undid a 2011 law that largely undid the original 2004 initiative allowing medical marijuana, but late changes to the initiative resulted in new sections being added, which in turn resulted in a change in section numbering that unintentionally pushed back the date dispensaries could open. "The folks that are maybe the most in need are the least able to provide, to grow their own," the judge said in making his ruling. "I think speed is more important than niceties."

Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Congress Passes Health Bill That Includes $1 Billion for Opioid Fight. The Senate Monday gave final approval to HR 34, an omnibus health care bill that includes $1 billion for expanded opioid treatment programs. The legislation now heads for the president's desk. Obama is expected to sign it.

Law Enforcement

Trump Nominates Another Drug War Zealot to Head Department of Homeland Security. The Trump transition team has named General John Kelly to head the Department of Homeland Security. Kelly has said he believes marijuana is a gateway drug, that interdiction could be more efficient with increased funding, and that marijuana legalization sends a confusing message to Latin American leaders, among other things."This is looking really bad," said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. "First Sessions for Attorney General, then Price at HHS, and now yet another old-style drug war character for Homeland Security. It looks like Donald Trump is revving up to re-launch the failed drug war."

This Week's Corrupt Cops Stories

A bunch of Des Moines drug cases are now in doubt after a pair of cops are accused of planting drugs, a former New York cop gets sent away for selling "date rape" drugs, and more. Let's get to it:

In Des Moines, Iowa, two Des Moines police officers resigned Monday after officials accused them of planting evidence in a drug case last year. Senior Police Officers Joshua Judge, 30, and Tyson Teut, 30, left the force after superiors began investigating a complaint in a January 2015 case. But an internal investigation will review the hundreds of cases the pair worked since the both joined the department in August 2013. Stay tuned; criminal charges could be coming.

In St. Croix, the US Virgin Islands, an officer on the governor's security detail pleaded guilty last Thursday to using his law enforcement credentials to bypass TSA screening before he was later caught carrying about 40 pounds worth of cocaine onto a flight bound for Florida. Neal Chesterfield, 39, copped to possession with intent to distribute cocaine and faces an April sentencing date.

In New York City, a former Sleepy Hollow police officer was sentenced last Friday to eight years in prison for selling over a million dollars worth of an illegal analogue of GHB, widely described as a "date rape drug." Robert Smutek, 52, who had also served on a drug task force, also must forfeit $1.2 million in proceeds from the scheme.

Chronicle AM: Organic Foods Group Disses Kratom, DPA Releases Opioids Plan, More... (12/7/16)

An organic foods group says allowing kratom would be "dangerous," the Drug Policy Alliance comes out with a plan for heroin and prescription opioids, Iowa shuts down its asset forfeiture unit, and more.

The Natural Products Association says allowing kratom would be "dangerous." (Creative Commons/Wikimedia)
Marijuana Policy

Virginia Marijuana Arrests Plummet. Marijuana arrests have dropped 14% in the state over the past two years, the largest decline this century, and they appear headed for further declines this year. Changes in prosecutorial priorities appear to be behind the fall, with some prosecutors saying they need to husband their resources for felony prosecutions.

Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Drug Policy Alliance Releases Public Health and Safety Plan to Address Problematic Opioid Use and Overdose. The Drug Policy Alliance, the nation's leading proponent of drug policy reform, is releasing a plan to address increasing rates of opioid use and overdose (now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States). The plan marks a radical departure from the punitive responses that characterize much of US drug policy and instead focuses on scientifically proven harm reduction and public health interventions that can improve treatment outcomes and reduce the negative consequences of opioid misuse, such as transmission of infectious diseases and overdose. The plan has 20 specific recommendations, including establishing safe injection sites, moving ahead with prescription heroin (heroin-assisted treatment), and embracing Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) to keep people out of the criminal justice system and bring them in contact with social services.

Kratom

Natural Products Association Says Allowing Kratom Would Be "Dangerous." The largest trade group representing the organic and natural foods industry and dietary supplements makers has commented on the DEA's proposed ban on kratom, saying that "adding kratom to the US food supply could likely be dangerous and lead to serious unintended consequences." Kratom products have not met the strict standards for new items to be marketed to the public or undergone FDA approval, the group said. "Adding an untested and unregulated substance such as kratom to our food supply without the application of longstanding federal rules and guidelines would not only be illegal," said Daniel Fabricant, PhD, NPA's CEO and executive director. "It could likely be dangerous, leading to serious unintended consequences as our nation struggles with the crisis of opioid addiction."

Asset Forfeiture

Iowa Disbands State Asset Forfeiture Team, Returns $60,000 Taken From Travelers. Under increasing fire over asset forfeiture practices that saw a thousand seizures a year, the state Attorney General's Office announced Monday that the Department of Public Safety had disbanded its Interstate 80 drug interdiction and forfeiture team. The move came because of increased personnel demands and the need to focus on reducing traffic deaths, the office said, and had nothing to do with the recently announced settlement of a lawsuit brought by a pair of California gamblers who had $100,000 seized after they were stopped and a small amount of marijuana was found. That settlement resulted in the men getting most of their money back.

Law Enforcement

Justice Department Probing Possible Criminal Charges Over Atlanta DEA Informants. A DEA official told a congressional committee last week that the agency has referred "potential criminal charges" to the Justice Department over an Atlanta DEA supervisor who allegedly was in sexual relationships with two informants, one of whom was paid $212,000 for helping to bust four St. Louis drug traffickers. There are allegations of false documentation of payments to the snitch, who got $2,500 a month for two years, along with two "bonuses" of $55,000 and $80,750. The monthly payments apparently covered the rent for apartment near the DEA supervisor's home in the Atlanta metro area.

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